Events Diary

BNA 2019

Joint BAP/INS Symposium

Organised by: BAP and INS

Dublin

14th April 2019, 16:20 - 00:00

Mental illness in children and adolescents: neuroscience, ethics and practice in psychopharmacology

Mental health problems affect approximately 10% of children and adolescents. There are considerable scientific, medical and ethical challenges in youth mental health such as achieving accurate diagnosis, understanding the role of early adversity and environment, and appropriately targeting treatment, including drug treatment. Other issues include the potential impact of treatment decisions on the development of the brain and social maturation of the child. This symposium will examine these issues from multiple perspectives. The first part will examine biological mechanisms using translational approaches to reveal the effects of antipsychotics on the reward processing systems in the youth brain and the long-term impact of treatment in experimental models. The second part of the symposium will examine areas of on-going debate, including ethical debate in relation to prescribing practice. Child psychopharmacology and development will be viewed from the perspective of real world clinical practice, an area that stimulates important public discussions with clinicians, researchers and teachers. Early intervention and moral development in child psychiatry are important considerations but there is limited research. Novel perspectives will be presented.

Chairs: Dr Gabriela Pavarini, University of Oxford & Prof. Mitul Mehta, King’s College London

Speakers

Prof. Judith Homberg, Radbound University, Netherlands
Psychopharmacology in the young and developing brain: perspectives from experimental animal studies

Dr. Argyris Stringaris, National Institutes of Mental Health, USA
Manipulating the reward system to alleviate youth depression

Prof. Paramela Santosh, Maudsley Hospital & King’s College London
Child psychopharmacology and development: perspectives from real world clinical practice

Dr Gabriela Pavarini, University of Oxford, UK
Early intervention and moral development in child psychiatry

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